Tuesday, March 31, 2015

A Nasi Goreng Recipe

After decades of Spanish-influenced fiesta fare and American fast food junk, Pinoys are now starting to appreciate the cuisine of its South East Asian neighbors. Restos serving Vietnamese, Thai, and Malay food are becoming a common sight.


A favorite among locals is nasi goreng. Literally meaning fried rice, it is just basically the Indonesian/Malaysian version of the sinangag, with much more spices other than garlic. My office mates, the events, food & lodging coordinators (EFLC) foodies, like my version so much that I'm sharing this recipe with them.


Ingredients: 
5 cloves of garlic, minced
4 cups left-over rice
1 onion, sliced thinly
1 tomato, sliced
spring onions, or onion leeks, sliced diagonally
2 tbsp chili sauce
2 tbsp bagoong alamang (shrimp paste)
3 tbsp kecap manis (sweet soy sauce)

Optional:
2 medium eggs
1/3 cup mixed vegetables -peas, diced carrots 
crushed chili

Apart from being really hot and spicy for most Pinoys' taste, nasi goreng uses kecap manis, or sweet soy sauce. It is available in many SM groceries. The traditional Indonesian version also uses a stronger, dried version of the shrimp paste. The local bagoong alamang substitutes nicely.

Just like in sinangag, it is best to use cold (left-over) rice. Break down the rice using a spatula or the back of a large spoon, or your clean hands, to unclump them. Set aside.

In a large wok, saute the garlic, onion, and tomatoes.

Add in the bagoong alamang and chili sauce.

Add in the rice. Stir fry until hot.

Mix in the kecap manis.

Add in more bagoong, chili, and kecap manis to taste.


(Optional) With the heat still on, make space in the center of the wok. Put in the eggs and again stir fry, mixing the eggs well into the rice.

Garnish with spring onions.

Serve.

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